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June 28th, 2016

Mayo Clinic and Transplant Genomics Collaborating to Develop Individualized Treatments to Minimize Transplant Rejection

By Sharon Rosen

Transplant Genomics 4

A new collaboration is aimed at providing diagnostic tests that can reveal early signs of organ rejection for patients who have undergone an organ transplant. These tests may help physicians adjust immunosuppression medications, which are used to maintain the function of the transplanted organ, prevent organ rejection and minimize side effects.

Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine is collaborating with Transplant Genomics Inc.(TGI) to develop and commercialize diagnostic tests enabling personalized immunosuppression for solid organ transplant recipients.

Physicians and researchers from Mayo Clinic campuses in Arizona, Florida and Rochester, Minnesota are participating in this collaboration. Principal investigators include: Mark Stegall, M.D., Raymond Heilman, M.D., and Martin Mai, M.D., all from Mayo Clinic Transplant Center.

“At Mayo, our research in this area is focused on improving long-term kidney graft survival, so that patients would lead healthier lives. Genomic analysis of blood can reveal early signs of rejection in transplanted kidneys. The potential clinical utility is to be able to monitor for rejection more frequently than is possible with surveillance biopsies and to individualize immunosuppression in transplant recipients,” says Dr. Stegall.

This multiyear collaboration includes an assessment of TGI's TruGraf test for renal transplant monitoring, a Mayo Clinic investment in TGI, and the co-development of new tests and technologies for additional targets, including exploratory studies in heart and liver transplantation.

TruGraf’s ability to detect early transplant rejection in patients with stable kidney transplant function will provide physicians with a tool to help provide the appropriate levels of immunosuppressive therapy.

Our first collaborative project together is a case study in individualized medicine in which TruGraf will be used to support decisions around personalized immunosuppression,” says Roy First, M.D., chief medical officer, Transplant Genomics.

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Tags: center for individualized medicine, Dr. Mark Stegall, Dr. Martin Mai, Dr. Raymond Heilman, Dr. Roy First, genomic medicine, immunosuppression, immunosuppression medications, individualized medicine, organ transplant, organ transplant rejection, pharmacogenomics, Precision Medicine, Transplant Genomics, TruGraf test, Uncategorized

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